It’s all a gamble…….

Life is a huge gamble. Choices made daily affect the choices of tomorrow which in turn steer you on a meandering path to death. No-one knows whether any of the seemingly innocuous choices will affect your path adversely or positively. We are all navigating blind, with hairpins and dark corners the consequence of any ill considered decision. With this in mind, can anyone be truly happy? or is life just a meaningless compromise. A trade off between simplicity and the spiritual wealth of pure joy.

Bummer

Mercedes 190 SL

Mercedez World at the old Brooklands Race circuit has some stunning cars, from the sublime to the ridiculous. Upstairs, the AMG tweaked range starts in excess of £100,000 whilst the classics of an era past reside majestically downstairs.

Mercedes 190 SL

The Mercedes-Benz 190SL was a two door grand touring convertible with a removable hardtop. It was produced by Mercedes-Benz between May 1955 and February 1963. A prototype was first shown at the New York Auto Show of 1954.

The 190SL was sold alongside the faster, more expensive Mercedes-Benz 300SL, which it closely resembled both in its styling and in its fully independent suspension, with both cars having double wishbone suspensions at the front and swing axles at the rear. However, the 190SL did not use the 300SL’s purpose-built tubular spaceframe W198 platform, but was instead built on the shortened monocoque R121 platform, which was modified from the W121 small saloon platform.[2]

The 190SL was powered by a completely new, slightly oversquare 1.9L straight-four SOHC engine (Type M121 BII), that developed 105 PS (77 kW; 104 hp) (or 120 gross hp) that earned itself a reputation for not running that smoothly[3] mostly due to the difficulty in properly synchronising the twin-choke dual Solex carburetors, and that, in detuned form, was later also used in the W120 180 and W121 190 models. In fact, the four cylinder engine block of the 190SL was based on the six cylinder engine of the 300 SL.[4] The 85 mm bore was transferred unchanged from the larger engine to the smaller, although the stroke for the 190 SL was reduced from 88.0 mm to 83.6 mm.[4]

The car was available either as a soft-top convertible (initially priced at DM 16,500/$ 3,998[5]) or with removable hardtop (DM 17,650/$ 4,295). A nice option to be had was the third-passenger transversal seat that could even fit an adult. In its early life, the 190SL could also be had as a sports-racing model with small perspex windscreen and aluminum doors. In 1959, the hardtop’s rear window was enlarged.

The 190SL was also referred to as the Nitribitt-Mercedes after the scandal surrounding the murder of the call girl Rosemarie Nitribitt, who owned a 190SL.

Both the 190SL and the 300SL were replaced by the Mercedes-Benz 230SL in 1963.

Lulworth Cove – Dorset

Lulworth - Dorset

The cove has formed because there are bands of rock of alternating resistance running parallel to the shore (a concordant coastline). On the seaward side the clays and sands have been eroded away. A narrow (less than 30 metre) band of Portland limestone rocks forms the shoreline. Behind this is a narrow (less than 50 metre) band of slightly less resistant Purbeck limestone. Behind this are 300-350 metres of much less resistant clays and greensands (Wealden clays, Gault and Upper Greensand).
Forming the back of the cove is a 250 metre wide band of chalk, which is considerably more resistant than the clays and sands, but less resistant than the limestones. The entrance to the cove is a narrow gap in the limestone bands. This was formed by a combination of erosional processes by wave action , glacial melt waters and the processes of weathering. The wide part of the cove is where the weak clays and greensands have been eroded. The back of the cove is the chalk, which the sea has been unable to erode as fast.

The unique shape of the cove is a result of wave diffraction. The narrow entrance to the cove ensures that as waves enter they bend into an arced shape.

Not sure about this shot, taken in the context of a single photo. It was taken as one shot of a 7 or 8 shot panorama which worked reasonably well. But thought I’d have a play with some processing that’s a bit different to the usual crop/sharpen and save to try and emphasise the layers in the exposed face of the cliff. Perhaps a different crop would work better, what do you think??

St Catherine’s Chapel, Abbotsbury

St Catherines dates from the 14th century. It was built by the monks of Abbotsbury, possibly as a beacon for pilgrims coming to worship at the abbey in the village below. The chapel survived the Dissolution of the Monasteries that destroyed the abbey, because it was so valued as a navigational beacon to sailers making the crossing of Lyme Bay.

Because it was dedicated to St Catherine, the patron saint of spinsters, the chapel became popular as a place for women to pray for a husband. In the words of an old prayer:

A Husband, St Catherine,
A handsome one, St Catherine,
A rich one, St Catherine,
A nice one, St Catherine,
And soon, St Catherine.

The chapel is built entirely of local stone, hauled up the hill to the building site. There is a small oratory in the turret. The interior is bare, though regular musical events are held in the chapel, featuring local musicians. Surrounding the chapel are a series of medieval strip lynchets; terraces cut into the hillside for agricultural purposes. The lynchets are know locally as Chapel Rings, and are quite striking when seen from the village below.

The climb from the village takes 10 minutes or so (depending on how many stops you take to enjoy the view!). The slope is not terribly steep, and once you’ve reached the top, a very short level walk to the seaward side of the hill gives stunning views out over Lyme Bay, with Abbotsbury Swannery, The Fleet, and Chesil Bank in the foreground.

St Catherine's Chapel