Autumn in the new forest

Autumn in the new forest is always a treat, there’s fewer people around for starters, and the leaves and autumnal colours are much easier on the eye than the great green swathes of summer. Always plenty to do or see, and the pubs/restaurants serve some of the best food in the UK.

Week 2 – Autumn

Right, week 2 and I found myself struggling. There doesn’t seem to be many trees about at the moment with Autumnal Leaves. Everything’s still pretty green. Additionally, whilst out and about most of the fields in darkest Essex have been ploughed, and whilst Autumna, aren’t that inspiring.

So, with options 1 and 2 out of the window (and with it a chance to improve my landscape shots) I was forced indoors again for the second week running.

With some help from the wife and kids I acquired some conkers (or chestnuts to the young and PC brigade) which inspired these. Hopefully it doesn’t look like they were just plonked on the bar indoors and next time I will take some setup shots to accompany the explanation.

Autumn - Week 2

Autumn - Week 2

Autumn - Week 2

Come into my parlour…

MacroSpider

Cross Spider Araneus diadematus
Also known as European garden spider, Diadem spider, or Cross Orbweaver
Family Araneidae (Orb Weavers)

Description: The Cross Spider or Garden Spider is a very common and well-known orb-weaver spider in Western Europe. Individual spiders can range from light yellow, to orange-brown or dark grey, but all European garden spiders have mottled markings across the back with five or more large white dots forming a cross. Usually, the cross-like markings are quite visible. The mother puts eggs in a small cocoon, which looks more like a little web.

How big are they? Adult females range in length from 6.5 to 20 millimeters, and the males are 5.5 to 13 millimeters long.

Range / Habitat: Introduced in the United States from Western and Northern Europe. The cross spider lives in parts of North America, in a range extending from New England and the Southeast to California and the Northwestern United States and adjacent parts of Canada.

The cross spider is common in a wide range of habitats, including gardens, meadows, woodland clearings and hedgerows. It is commonly encountered next to buildings with exterior lighting. The spiders can be found in lighted stairwells of structures in rural areas.