Man at C&A – Or, for the young ones, man at River Island…..

Srike a pose

The Essex countryside, particularly on the Dengie Peninsular never fails to surprise me with the quality of the light at times. Despite having not much to do I couldn’t resist a couple of shots of Tommy doing his best to look moody on the banks of the Blackwater on Sunday evening…… Immediately prior to this I was shooting some landscape shots and still had a 2 stop graduated ND filter attached, so the net result here is pretty much straight out of the camera. There’s a bit of a WB Issue, but with some tweaks I’m fairly sure that it’s a keeper…..

Fearless Frank – Young Robin

Young Robin

I know Robins tend to be curious and fearless when investigating but this little chap took to the extremes. I was sat outside and he/she just hopped up, closer and closer until it was practically sitting on my shoe. I fully expected it to disappear, but when I stood up to get my camera, it fluttered away just far enough outside my minimum focus distance for me to get a couple of shots. I’m no expert but I’m guessing it’s fairly young and can’t see it lasting long out there unless it gets a bit more streetwise….

Red thing, possibly an ant on a grass seed………

Red thing on Grass Seed....

 

 

The harder I try not to take any Macro shots, the more I seem to end up with – Was out for a walk yesterday along the banks of the River Blackwater in Essex.  Was looking to try and take an uncluttered panorama of the river and spotted a grass seed head that looked a bit odd (as in the wrong colour).  Only had the 70-200 F2.8 Sigma on me, and was quite pleased with the end result here.

Free as a bird

Went for a walk with the 70-300mm on. This was unusuyal to say the least as this lens rarely sees the light of day when there are no football matches to shoot.
Having acquired an upgrade to the Sigma 70-200 f2.8 (which hopefully arrives today) I thought it would be good to have an outing with a longer lens than usual. It wasn’t a photographic outing, more of a dog walk (with kids) along the bank of the River Blackwater from Waterside Holiday Park to the Stone Inn whereupon it seemed necessary to stop for a refreshing and very pleasant Shandy whilst taking in the view.http://www.davefrost.co.uk/wordpress/wp-admin/post-new.php

Free as a bird

The River Blackwater is a river in England. It rises in the northwest of Essex as the River Pant and flows to Bocking, near Braintree, from where its name changes to the Blackwater. Its course takes it near Stisted, and then via Bradwell Juxta Coggeshall and Coggeshall and near Witham where it is joined by the River Brain. Passing Maldon it reaches the North Sea at West Mersea. The River Chelmer (which is a canal at that point) meets the River Blackwater near Langford. Some of the water flows over Beeleigh weir and some flows down the canal. At Heybridge flood water from the canal flows over a weir at the site of the old Heybridge mill and down the original course of the Blackwater (now known as Heybridge Creek) before passing through a sluice gate into the tidal Blackwater Estuary at Maldon. One of the most famous Viking battles in Britain, the Battle of Maldon, took place directly beside the river in 991. The Vikings were successful in battle against the Anglo-Saxons, claiming victory in this Dark Age battle.

The Blackwater was a source of fish and oysters for the town of Maldon during the Roman occupation. The remains of Saxon fish traps were discovered in the river in the 1990s.
During the winter of 1776 the Blackwater froze from Maldon to Osea island, a distance of some four miles. The ice trapped fishing and cargo carrying vessels and blocked any imports of coal, oil, wool to Maldon.
In 1793 the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation Company was formed by act of Parliament. Over the next four years, the company built a navigation from Chelmsford to meet the tidal estuary of the River Blackwater in Colliers Reach at the place that’s today called Heybridge Basin (after the canal basin there).
The burgers of the borough of Maldon refused to allow the canal to pass through their borough, so the company routed it just outside the borough boundary, which is why it ended up at Colliers Reach, rather than at Maldon. From Chelmsford, the navigation mainly followed the course of the River Chelmer until it reached Beeleigh, near Maldon. Then it followed the course of the River Blackwater to Heybridge, and from there via a canal to the sea lock at Colliers Reach.
A weir connected the navigation to the tidal river Blackwater at Heybridge, where it powered a water mill. Heybridge mill was demolished after severe flooding in this area in 1953, but the mill house still stands. The river itself (now known as Heybridge Creek here) was dammed between Heybridge Hall and Potman marsh in 1954 as part of a programme of flood defence improvements. Most of the water flowing down the River Blackwater nowadays flows over a weir at Beeleigh and along the tidal section of the Chelmer before rejoining the Blackwater just below the Hythe at Maldon.