Come into my parlour…

MacroSpider

Cross Spider Araneus diadematus
Also known as European garden spider, Diadem spider, or Cross Orbweaver
Family Araneidae (Orb Weavers)

Description: The Cross Spider or Garden Spider is a very common and well-known orb-weaver spider in Western Europe. Individual spiders can range from light yellow, to orange-brown or dark grey, but all European garden spiders have mottled markings across the back with five or more large white dots forming a cross. Usually, the cross-like markings are quite visible. The mother puts eggs in a small cocoon, which looks more like a little web.

How big are they? Adult females range in length from 6.5 to 20 millimeters, and the males are 5.5 to 13 millimeters long.

Range / Habitat: Introduced in the United States from Western and Northern Europe. The cross spider lives in parts of North America, in a range extending from New England and the Southeast to California and the Northwestern United States and adjacent parts of Canada.

The cross spider is common in a wide range of habitats, including gardens, meadows, woodland clearings and hedgerows. It is commonly encountered next to buildings with exterior lighting. The spiders can be found in lighted stairwells of structures in rural areas.

A strange flower in a garden devoid of flora

Strange Flower

Whilst out in the garden I was surprised to find this. Surprised mostly because our garden is utterly devoid of Flora with the exception of our neighbours Ivy and some weedy grass. No idea what kind of flower it is and never have I seen one like it before. The Stamen are shaped like some sort of Alien Helicopter and the flies seem to like it, as do the gnats. Otherwise it was just there, on it’s own

Recorded for posterity with the Tamron 17-50 F2.8 with a 12mm Kenko Extention tube attached.

Morning Glory

Morning Glory

Early Autumn Mornings just can’t be beaten, especially when at six o’clock it’s already 18 degrees with a promise of record breaking sunshine. The heat creating a lovely ground hugging mist, coating everything in tiny droplets of water.

This cobweb, was captured with a Canon 50mm f1.8 and 30mm of Kenko Macro extension tubes.

The Eye of the Storm

Someone mentioned my eyes earlier on today and I had a moment spare so though it might be fun to try for a decent image of my Iris. Used the 50mm 1.8 @ f2.8, on camera flash and a 12mm Kenko Extension tube. Was harder to focus (with the tube on) but didn’t need to crop so harshly.

Eye of doom

Stapler, patented in 1866, improved numerous times since………

Stapler - Up close and personal

The first known stapler was handmade in the 18th century in France for King Louis XV. Each staple was inscribed with the insignia of the royal court, as required.[1] The growing uses of paper in the 19th century created a demand for an efficient paper fastener.[2]

In 1866, George McGill received U.S. patent 56,587 [3] for a small, bendable brass paper fastener that was a precursor to the modern staple. In 1867, he received U.S. patent 67,665[4] for a press to insert the fastener into paper. He showed his invention at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and continued to work on these and other various paper fasteners through the 1880s. In 1868 a patent was also taken out for a stapler in England by C.H.Gould. As well, also in 1868, Albert Kletzker of St Louis, MO patented a device to staple paper.

In 1877 Henry R. Heyl filed patent number 195603 for the first machines to both insert and clinch a staple in one step [5],and for this reason some consider him as the inventor of the modern stapler. In 1876 and 1877 Heyl also filed patents for the Novelty Paper Box Manufacturing Co of Philadelphia,PA [6], However, the N. P. B. Manufacturing Co.’s inventions were to be used to staple boxes and books.

The first machine to hold a magazine of many preformed staples came out in 1878.

On February 18, 1879, George McGill received patent 212,316[7] for the McGill Single-Stroke Staple Press, the first commercially successful stapler. This device weighed over two and a half pounds and loaded a single 1/2 inch wide wire staple, which it could drive through several sheets of paper.

The first published use of the word “stapler” to indicate a machine for fastening papers with a thin metal wire was in an advertisement in the American Munsey’s Magazine in 1901