The Scream

Imagine my delight when the humdrum and otherwise normal Thursday evening of pointless TV was interrupted by the discovery of a dead fly.
Armed with the off camera flash, wireless triggers ant a 12mm Kenko Tube, I first drew some stick like pictures and posed the corpse. You know the stuff, staircases, horses etc.
None of these were particularly good, so I just tried different angles for the flash, at different power settings until I came up with this.

Can’t be bothered to do much processing so you get it here in all it’s dead, and decaying glory….. Quite like the ‘expression on it’s poor dead face.

The Scream

Stapler, patented in 1866, improved numerous times since………

Stapler - Up close and personal

The first known stapler was handmade in the 18th century in France for King Louis XV. Each staple was inscribed with the insignia of the royal court, as required.[1] The growing uses of paper in the 19th century created a demand for an efficient paper fastener.[2]

In 1866, George McGill received U.S. patent 56,587 [3] for a small, bendable brass paper fastener that was a precursor to the modern staple. In 1867, he received U.S. patent 67,665[4] for a press to insert the fastener into paper. He showed his invention at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and continued to work on these and other various paper fasteners through the 1880s. In 1868 a patent was also taken out for a stapler in England by C.H.Gould. As well, also in 1868, Albert Kletzker of St Louis, MO patented a device to staple paper.

In 1877 Henry R. Heyl filed patent number 195603 for the first machines to both insert and clinch a staple in one step [5],and for this reason some consider him as the inventor of the modern stapler. In 1876 and 1877 Heyl also filed patents for the Novelty Paper Box Manufacturing Co of Philadelphia,PA [6], However, the N. P. B. Manufacturing Co.’s inventions were to be used to staple boxes and books.

The first machine to hold a magazine of many preformed staples came out in 1878.

On February 18, 1879, George McGill received patent 212,316[7] for the McGill Single-Stroke Staple Press, the first commercially successful stapler. This device weighed over two and a half pounds and loaded a single 1/2 inch wide wire staple, which it could drive through several sheets of paper.

The first published use of the word “stapler” to indicate a machine for fastening papers with a thin metal wire was in an advertisement in the American Munsey’s Magazine in 1901

A point in the right direction……

You get the point......

Had a quick play with the Kenko Macro Tubes today after being invited to take part in a Macro project earlier in the week. Neither of these really cuts it but was fun dabbling again. Shame there aren’t many flies about and all the spiders have moved to Mazda. these were taken with the Tamron 17-50mm f2.8 which despite being dropped (again) is still producing some nice sharp images. This was attached to the 30D via a 20mm Kenko tube.

No flash for this, just what was left of the natural daylight in the office, handheld too (would recommend a tripod though) with a shutter speed of 0.8 @ f5, ISO 100